The breakfast kitchen is officially open in 12 hours, 7am Honduras time.  I am excited and looking forward to the early mornings although I am unsure how many time a week I will be able to go.  I know Kevin is planning on going 3 times a week.  We have starting all the enrolling process for both Gisselle and Cristian to attend a local Christian Bilingual school Minerva with the next school year that will start on August 26th.  It will start with a 6 month English intensive to get them acclimated and bilingual as most classes are only taught in English. 

Kevin is starting his third week of teaching English to some local pastors and school teachers.  Having not had the chance to preach since being here in Honduras, he is really enjoying the teaching and like using his bilingual Bible to pick some great versus to use with each lesson.

As we near our 90th day, we are planning a trip to Guatemala in a little over a week to renew our visas.  We found a decent size town that has caves to explore and even a zoo.  I am not really looking forward to the drive, but excited about a few more stamps in my passport. 

Other exciting news is we will have a friend down from the states to help with all the things that are getting started around her.  Rachel bought her ticket and is working on packing for a full month long stay!  I look forward to what she will add with her stay and how God will use this time in her life. 

I leave you with a picture of my favorite flower at our house.  If anyone knows that name, I would love to know also.
It smells amazing!

Picture
 


Comments

02/05/2012 7:53am

Frangipani

Plumeria rubraZone 10
Plumeria is the classic Hawaiian leis tree. Its flowers are the ones used to form the colorful, tropical flower necklaces (lei) every tourist to our 50th state wears during at least one beach party
Native to Tropical America, from southern Mexico, northern South America and the West Indies, Plumeria is rated a small tree, to about 15-18 feet and is seen in a variety of solid colors. We have seen some grow much larger
The flowers are about 2 inches long, arranged in 5 petals, are waxy and fragrant. It blooms in spring and through all the summer months
th state wears during at least one beach party
Native to Tropical America, from southern Mexico, northern South America and the West Indies, Plumeria is rated a small tree, to about 15-18 feet and is seen in a variety of solid colors. We have seen some grow much larger
The flowers are about 2 inches long, arranged in 5 petals, are waxy and fragrant. It blooms in spring and through all the summer months
The tree itself is multi-branched and holds thick foliage. The young tree has green wood on the trunk and branches which become more gray as it matures. Plumeria is related to Oleander, Periwinkle and Allamanda
It has many common names throughout the tropical world including:
• Dead Man's Finger (Australia)
• Jasmine de Cayenne (Brazil)
• Pagoda Tree or Temple Tree (India)
• Egg Flower (southern China)
• Amapola (Venezuela)
Plumeria-Frangipani is deciduous losing all its leaves in winter. It can look awful without its leaves. Here a staghorn fern is growing in this frangipani
Folks who feel their Plumeria requires pruning should wait until the dormant period is well along then cut for shape
Many who grow Plumeria as a houseplant get very upset in the fall and winter months as the leaves start to look sick and fall off one by one. It's natural. Water should be at absolute minimum during all dormant months
This tree prefers full sun or shifting shade and hot weather during blooming months. Not too fussy for soil conditions, Plumeria can grow fairly close to the beach, but without full wind. Enriched soil is preferred and good drainage should be provided
The classic Plumeria is the rubra. Rubra can be found with flowers in various tones of red. Other available varieties include:
• Plumeria alba (white)
• Plumeria obtusa (white with yellow center)
• Plumeria obtusa 'Singapore'
• Plumeria 'Nosegay Frangipani'
• Plumeria rubra 'Tricolor'
Many hard-to-find varieties are shown at the Virtual International Plumeria Society
The hot new Plumeria in South Florida is the Plumeria pudica. Plumeria pudica blooms as many as 10 months a year and has only partial leaf drop during winter. Foliage is unique as well

click pics to enlarge
New are the dwarf Plumerias. The best one we have seen was planted in a 18-inch terra cotta bowl set on a pedestal. Because of the plant's full leaf habit and many stems, it looked somewhat like a bonsai plant. In the spring and summer, it blooms like the standard Plumeria. With blooms at eye level, the dwarf was a real show stopper
Want even more Plumerias? OK, well, go to The Dean Conklin Plumeria Grove is part of the Honolulu Botanical Gardens
More? You want still more Plumerias? Geez, OK. Here are Plumerias from the Dean Conklin Plumeria Garden at Koko Crater Honolulu Botanical Gardens

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